Solving two-step linear equations using distributive property: a(x + b) = c

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Intros
Lessons
    • What is Distributive Property?
    • How to use distributive property to solve linear equations?
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Examples
Lessons
  1. Solve the equation using model.
    1. 4(x+1)=124\left( {x + 1} \right) = 12
    2. 2(x−3)=82\left( {x - 3} \right) = 8
  2. Solve.
    1. 3(x−9)=453\left( {x - 9} \right) = 45
    2. 7(10+x)=147\left( {10 + x} \right) = 14
    3. −15=3(x−6) - 15 = 3\left( {x - 6} \right)
    4. −22=11(x+13) - 22 = 11\left( {x + 13} \right)
  3. John has a round table with a circumference of 314.16 cm, but it is too big for his new home. So, he cut off a 10 cm wide border around the edge.
    1. Write the equation that represents the situation.
    2. What is the circumference of the table now? Round your answer to two decimal places.
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Practice
Topic Notes
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Distributive property is an algebra property that we use all the time! When you see equations in the form of a(x+b), you can transform them into ax+ab by multiplying the terms inside a set of parentheses. In this section, we will make use of this property to help us solve linear equations.